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Classic Ford’s photographers pick their favourite – and most memorable – images.

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SZANTOSPORT’S Mk1 Escort

Photographer: Chris Wallbank

Location: Sheffield, UK

Year: 2012

“Ben Szanto has had a few cars featured in Classic Ford in the past and this Mk1 Escort of his made the cover with a rather smoky burnout! What do you don’t get to see from this image is that it took actually three separate burnouts just get the right amount of smoke without it getting blown over the whole car making the Escort virtually invisible! This was made even trickier by the fact the car was white. One of my favourite elements of this shot is the Yorkshire man’s mischievous grin peering out of the window.”

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Street Racer Mk2 Zephyr

Photographer: Jon Hill

Location: Canary Wharf, UK

Year: 2008

“Kevin Church’s Zephyr was the result of an epic build that finished as one of the best Five Star Fords ever to be built. It featured a 351 Cleveland Ford V8 with plenty of ’60s touches including Cal Custom valve covers and a Brute Scoop air cleaner. We shot it in the Canary Wharf area at night while getting hassle from a security guard who insisted we were on private land — our case not helped by mate, Al Barnett saying to him, “Look mate, just cos you’re telly’s broke there’s no need to hassle us!”

Croix Blanche Turbo Fiesta XR2

Photographer: Bryn Musselwhite

Location: Ypres, Belgium

Year: 2012

“Action shots are the closest we can get in print to showing you a feature car on the move — panning being one of the most popular kind of shots. Trouble is, they can get boring, so I’m always looking for ways to mix it up. I took this one hidden from view down an alley as Kristof Wuyts approached from the right at about 40 mph, shooting at a 30th of a second, I knew I would probably only have one shot per pass, so I estimated when he would come into view and started to move the camera from right to left before he appeared. And it worked!”

Ken Block’s Hoonigan Escort

Photographer: Adrian Brannan

Location: Santa Pod Raceway, UK

Year: 2016

“This was quite an elaborate shot involving the careful positioning of both the Escort and choreography of Ken donuting in the background in his four-wheel-drive Mustang! Thankfully, Ken was super consistent and this allowed to get some variations of the same shot. A skilled driver is especially good when the composition is being constructed in one shot with the camera on a tripod — plus three portable studio lights to subtly light up some shaded areas. There’s no need for any post-production fakery when you plan well!”

Superspeed Mk2 Cortina

Photographer: Gerard Hughes

Location: Cork, Ireland

Year: 2013

“We’ve seen some beautiful cars come out of Ireland over the years, and Anthony Sheehan’s Mk2 Cortina was no exception, with amazing build quality and a host of neat Superspeed details. We’d been in Ireland for the Cortina Club Of Ireland’s 50th Anniversary celebrations, and this was our last call before catching the ferry home. The Port of Cork gave us a dramatic backdrop to the shoot — the Aqua Jade paint really popped against the concrete and steel. And even though we’d battled with mixed weather all week, the sun shone for us.”

Retro Ford’s Duratec Mk2 Escort

Photographer: Jon Hill

Location: Bruntingthorpe, UK

Year: 2006

“Dave Colledge’s Mk2 Escort was a development car in the very early years of Retro Ford, and from the days when Dave could spend time with us mucking about at Bruntingthorpe Proving Ground — sadly things are a bit different now, due to business commitments. This image was part of a handling feature we did with Northampton Motorsport, where three cars were involved. At the time, Dave was smoking the tyres thanks to a locked diff, while negotiating the bottom corner at Bruntingthorpe probably in the region of 100 mph… Happy days!”

Mk2.5 Capri

Photographer: Adrian Brannan

Location: Glasgow, UK

Year: 2006

“Rewind right back to my very first shoot for Classic Ford and I’m in one of my favourite locations — under Glasgow’s 10-lane Kingston Bridge. Looking back at this shoot 12 years on, it could be improved with some more experience and better equipment, but I still love it. A cool car, well-suited location and a sound owner who was up for some hijinks… It was ideal, and so perhaps no surprise that more than a decade later, I’m still happily shooting for Classic Ford — given this was my first impression of working for the mag!”

Cosworth Mk1 Escort

Photographer: Chris Wallbank

Location: Ta-Qali, Malta

Year: 2013

“Over the 11 years that I’ve been working for Classic Ford I’ve always loved shooting on the Maltese islands. The weather is always perfect for photography and the cars are always immaculate! Here’s a shot of Reuben Schemeri’s black Mk1 Escort that was taken close to sunset, which was made particularly memorable by that fact I was hanging out of the boot of rental Toyota Aygo that desperately struggled to keep up with the Cosworth-powered Escort!”

Thames 300E V6 Van

Photographer: Gerard Hughes

Location: Cannock, UK

Year: 2009

“It can be tough finding the right location for a car shoot, and sometimes owners can be surprised that we go for the grotty rather than the glamorous. Neil Hems knew what we were after when we shot his immaculate 300E van and had managed to arrange access to a derelict Ford dealership for us. The shoot has always stayed with me as the van was an absolute jewel, and I don’t think I’ve ever seen such perfect detailing. Everything was finished to the most exacting standards, with unique touches everywhere.

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Mk1 Escort

Photographer: Bryn Musselwhite

Location: Lochem, The Netherlands

Year: 2012

“Nobody in my family was into old Fords, but thanks in no small part to my contributing to the magazine since 2000, I have owned Capris, Transits, a couple of Cortinas and an Anglia — but never an Escort. Yet for me, they epitomise the classic Ford world and you know what? They look best going sideways. So when Bert Kok chucked his Mk1 in and appeared around the side of a quiet old industrial building, he summed it all up in one glorious moment for me. All I had to do was press a button. Thanks Bert.”

This feature first appeared in our Photography Special/June 2018 issue

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